Lancia Delta HF Integrale


The Integrale Evolves

The desire to keep winning the World Rally Championship led to a regular series of updates under the Integrale banner.

In 1989 came the 16-valve model to replace its 8-valve predecessor. The new model – generally considered more desirable than the 8-valve to today’s enthusiast - sported an aggressive, power-bulge bonnet to accommodate the taller 16-valve engine. Although these engines are more powerful, the 8-valves are not without their advantages. For example, the torque on an 8-valve comes in lower down, making it more driveable; the emissions are lower; and it’s cheaper to maintain.

Then, in 1991, came the 16-valve Evoluzione, or Evo, as it was affectionately dubbed. As well as various styling changes and a widening of the Evo’s track, there was a further increase in power – offset by a gain in weight.

The Evo 2 differed stylistically from the Evo 1 but technical changes were few – primarily a catalytic convertor and a smaller turbo with a remapped chip. To make up for the effects of the cat, the engine developed an extra 5bhp and, of course, the smaller turbo gave rise to different torque curve for the Evo 2.

In addition to the Evo 1 and 2, there were several Special Editions, such as the exclusive and highly-prized Club Italia of which only 15 were built. As well as the mainstream Specials there were a number of one-off Integrales – including a two-door convertible for the Agnelli family.

One final twist in the Integrale model range is the fact that there are, confusingly, some 8-valve Evoluzione models. These were produced for countries with very strict emissions laws, such as Switzerland, where the 16-valve engine was unable to meet the requirements.



A Rally-Derived Superstar
A Rally-Derived Superstar

The Integrale Evolves
The Integrale Evolves

Who Owns Them?
Who Owns Them?

The facts -
The facts -